Thomas H and Emma (Hamilton) McClelland, Johnstown, Pennsylvania

Thomas and Emma (Hamilton) McClelland

Thomas and Emma (Hamilton) McClelland

Thomas H McClelland and Emma Hamilton were married in Johnstown, Pennsylvania on April 5, 1888. Their first child, James D was born in February 1889. At the time of the Johnstown flood of 1889, Thomas, Emma and James were living at 42 Market Street, Johnstown. All three survived.

I didn’t see Thomas in the 1893 city directory of Johnstown, so I don’t know if they moved away after the flood, but if so, they returned and remained in Johnstown until 1903. Meanwhile, their two other sons were born: George B on October 8, 1891, and Merle on April 27 in either 1894 or 1895.

In 1902 or 1903 they bought a home in Upper Yoder Township. Shortly after that, on February 10, 1903, Emma died “after an illness of three months, of stomach trouble” according to her obituary. Thomas remained there with his sons, eventually marrying Gertrude Ream in April 1910. Thomas died in 1932.

George & James McClelland

George & James McClelland

Emma and Thomas’ sons had families of their own: James married Odessa E Strawn in 1915 and raised at least five children. Merle married Eva Ream in 1917; they had at least four children of their own, and one, I believe from Eva’s previous marriage–I may be wrong. George married Marie Mattern in 1916, and it doesn’t appear that they had children.

These two photographs were with my great-grandmother’s belongings. I don’t know when either were taken, except to guess by the ages of the people in the photographs. Note that the handwritten label of the one of George and Jay has the names in reverse. George is the younger of the two.

Emma Hamilton was my great-grandfather’s sister. For more on her family see the Hamilton tag in the sidebar.

Thomas’ parents were David McClelland and Margaret Hammond. The McClellands were from Carrickmannon Townland, Killinchy Parish, County Down, Ireland. The Hammonds were from County Antrim by way of County Sligo. There is more about them in the Family Trees > Pennsylvania Families section of this website.

Rose McNamee, 1922, Holy Name, Cleveland

Rose McNamee, 1922

Rose McNamee, 1922

The photographs section of this website includes a picture of the 1922 second grade class at Holy Name School, on Broadway on the southeast side of Cleveland. The picture is found at: Photographs > Cleveland Photographs > 1922 Holy Name Second Grade.

My mother was in that class and identified most of the children in the picture. She identified the second young woman from our right in the second row as Rosanna McNamee. There was a Rose/Rosina McNamee living in the area, described below, who is probably her.

Rose or Rosina McNamee was born about 1914 in Cleveland, the daughter of James McNamee and Anna Famera. 1 In 1920 the family was living on Sladden Avenue in Garfield Heights. Besides Rose and her parents, there were her two brothers James and Charles. In 1922 they were still on Sladden Ave; Rose’s father was working as an auto mechanic.2, 3

On July 18, 1936, Rose was married in Cuyahoga County, to Carl Smigel, and in 1940 they were living at 9002 Rosewood, Cleveland. 1, 4 Rose (McNamee) Smigel died on the 23rd of October, 1961, and is buried in Calvary Cemetery. Carl died in 1993. They had four children.5, 6

The Parsons Family Tree  family tree at ancestry.com includes Rose McNamee and her family. The tree says that Rose’s McNamee grandparents were born in Lanarkshire, Scotland.

If you are a relative or descendant of Rose McNamee you are welcome to download the class picture and pass it on.

Sources

1. Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Marriage Records and Indexes, 1810-1973, at ancestry.com, citing Vol 178-179; Page: 319

2. “United States Census, 1920,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MD1V-MW9 : accessed 28 Jun 2014), Rosina Mcnamee in household of James J Mcnamee, Garfield Heights, Cuyahoga, Ohio, United States; citing sheet 18A, family 371, NARA microfilm publication T625, FHL microfilm 1821375

3. 1922 Cleveland City at ancestry.com

4. “United States Census, 1940,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/KW5D-RLL : accessed 28 Jun 2014), Carl Smigel, Ward 15, Cleveland City, Cleveland City, Cuyahoga, Ohio, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 92-388, sheet 13A, family 254, NARA digital publication of T627, roll 3218.

5. Rose A Smigel, October 25, 1961, Cleveland Necrology File, Reel #156, Source: Plain Dealer. At http://dxsrv4.cpl.org/WebZ/Authorize?sessionid=0&next=/html/obit_start.html&dbchoice=1:dbname=necr&bad=html/authofail.html&style=noframe

6. Cleveland News Index, http://www-catalog.cpl.org/CLENIX

Vera Looby, 1922, Holy Name, Cleveland

Vera Looby, 1922

Vera Looby, 1922

The photographs section of this website includes a picture of the 1922 second grade class at Holy Name School, on Broadway on the southeast side of Cleveland. The picture is found at: Photographs > Cleveland Photographs > 1922 Holy Name Second Grade.

My mother was in that class and identified most of the children in the picture. She identified the fourth young woman from our right in the second row as Vera Looby. There was a Vera Looby living in the area, described below, who is probably her.

Vera Looby was born April 6, 1914, in Cleveland, Ohio, the daughter of William Looby and Matilda Divis.1, 2  In 1920 she and her family were living at 4080 East 108th Street. Beside Vera and her parents, there were her sisters Isabelle, Jane, Marie, and Marcella. The family was still there in 1922, the year that the photograph was taken.3, 4

On August 13, 1938, Vera married James Stetka, and in 1940 they were living on Gay Avenue in Cleveland. 2, 5  James Stetka died in 1955, and Vera on November 1, 1997, in Lakewood.1, 6  I’m not sure if they had children or not–James’ obituary did not mention any.

If you are a relative or descendant of Vera Looby you are welcome to download the class picture and pass it on.

Footnotes

1. “Ohio, Death Index, 1908-1932, 1938-1944, and 1958-2007,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VK2V-91X : accessed 24 Jun 2014), Veronica S Stetka, 01 Nov 1997; from “Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1932, 1938-1944, and 1958-2007,” index, Ancestry.com; citing vol. 31302, certificate number 086354, multiple archives.

2. Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Marriage Records and Indexes, 1810-1973, at ancestry.com, Vera Looby, August 13, 1938, Vol 184-185; Page: 556.

3. “United States Census, 1920,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MDRY-PQM : accessed 23 Jun 2014), William Lueby, Cleveland Ward 15, Cuyahoga, Ohio, United States; citing sheet 20A, family 479, NARA microfilm publication T625, FHL microfilm 1821367.

4. 1922 Cleveland City Directory, at ancestry.com.

5. “United States Census, 1940,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/KWRM-PQ9 : accessed 24 Jun 2014), James Stetka, Ward 30, Cleveland City, Cleveland City, Cuyahoga, Ohio, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 92-755, sheet 12B, family 250, NARA digital publication of T627, roll 3233.

6. James Stetka, June 22, 1955, Id#: 0740864, Cleveland Necrology File,  http://dxsrv4.cpl.org/WebZ/Authorize?sessionid=0&next=/html/obit_start.html&dbchoice=1:dbname=necr&bad=html/authofail.html&style=noframe, Reel #159, Source: Cleveland Press.

Elizabeth Lawler, Kilkenny to Cleveland

Elizabeth Lawler was born about 1838 in Castlecomer, County Kilkenny, Ireland, the daughter of Michael Lawler and Mary Curran. Elizabeth was married on November 27, 1855, in Notre Dame Basilica, Montreal, Canada, to John Kerwin. John was born about 1835 in Ireland, the son of Peter Kerwin and Mary Kerwin. At the time of their marriage, both their fathers were deceased. John’s mother was living in County Monaghan and Elizabeth’s in Kilkenny.1,2

Elizabeth and John had at least five children born in Montreal: Peter (1856), Michael (1858), Mary Anne (1861), John (1863), and Elizabeth (1866). Michael was buried in Montreal in 1860.3

By April 1868 the Kerwins were living in Cleveland, Ohio, when their son George was born. They had at least four more children in Cleveland: William (1874), Edward (1876), James (1879), and Nellie (1883). Nellie seems to have died before 1900.4

John Kerwin is found in the 1869 Cleveland City Directory at 429 Hamilton. The following year they moved to Newburgh, living on Marble Street. They spent most of the rest of their lives at 2371 Spafford or thereabouts, which is about 7800 Spafford the way the streets were numbered after 1906. John was working at the Cleveland Rolling Mill in 1876.5

Elizabeth (Lawler) Kerwin died October 2, 1903. John died, I believe, on April 29, 1905, and is buried in St. Joseph’s Cemetery, Cleveland.6

—–

There are 16 Lawlers on the Tithe Applotment Books (1823) in Castlecomer, Kilkenny, including two named Michael. There are no Michael Lawlers on Griffith’s Valuation of Castlecomer, taken in 1853, but there is a Mary Lawler on Chatsworth Row, Town of Castlecomer, that might be Elizabeth’s mother. 7,8

At the Killkenny section of rootsireland.ie, there is a match for an Elizabeth Lawler born to a Michael Lawler and Mary Curran in Kilkenny in 1835. This record could be Elizabeth’s.9

I didn’t find any Kerwins in County Monaghan on either the Tithe Applotment Books or on Griffith’s Valuation. Perhaps John Kerwin’s family was displaced by the famine or other events and his mother ended up in County Monaghan by 1855.

There is more about Elizabeth Lawler and her family in the Family Trees > Other Families section of this website.

For a little about Elizabeth and John’s great-grandaughter Marguerite Tulley, see the article Marguerite Tulley, 1922, Holy Name, Cleveland.

Sources

1 Elizabeth’s death record
2. Drouin Collection, Church Records, Quebec.
3. Drouin Records
4. Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, and Ohio birth records, familysearch.
5. Cleveland City Directory.
6. Ohio Death Records, familysearch, and the Cleveland Necrology File.
7. Tithe Applotment Books, National Archives of Ireland at http://titheapplotmentbooks.nationalarchives.ie/search
8. Griffith’s Valuation at askAboutIreland.ie
9. http://kilkenny.rootsireland.ie/

Marguerite Tulley, 1922, Holy Name, Cleveland

Marguerite Tulley, 1922

Marguerite Tulley, 1922

The photographs section of this website includes a picture of the 1922 second grade class at Holy Name School, on Broadway on the southeast side of Cleveland. The picture is found at: Photographs > Cleveland Photographs > 1922 Holy Name Second Grade.

My mother was in that class and identified most of the children in the picture. She identified the fifth young woman from our left in the second row as a a young lady named Tully. There was a Marguerite Tulley living in the area, described below, who is probably her.

Marguerite Tulley was born April 25, 1913, in Cleveland, the daughter of Simon F Tulley and Mary Keating. In 1920 the family was living at 4140 East 139th Street, and Marguerite’s father was a rivet worker. They also had a son Simon Francis Tulley, born in 1914. The family was still at that address in 1922, the year the photograph was taken.

Marguerite Tulley was living at 1403 Irene Road, Lyndhurst, on August 30, 1934, when she and Peter Kurzeika were married in Cleveland. Peter was a radio technician living on East 65th. They were separated by 1942 when Peter enlisted in the army, and were divorced by June 25, 1948, when Peter died.

Marguerite evidently married again to a man named Farrell, because that is the name on her death record information as transcribed at ancestry.com. She died in Cleveland on September 16, 1996. She had at least one child, a son, although she might have had more since her mother’s obituary said she was the grandmother of six.

If you are a relative or descendant of Marguerite Tulley you are welcome to download the class picture and pass it on.

Ancestry of Marguerite Tulley

There is more about this family in the Family Trees > Other Families section of this website.

For some information about one of Marguerite’s great-grandmothers see Elizabeth Lawler, Kilkenny to Cleveland.

Dorothy Vincent, 1922, Holy Name, Cleveland

Dorothy Vincent, 1922

Dorothy Vincent, 1922

The photographs section of this website includes a picture of the 1922 second grade class at Holy Name School, on Broadway on the southeast side of Cleveland. The picture is found at: Photographs > Cleveland Photographs > 1922 Holy Name Second Grade.

My mother was in that class and identified most of the children in the picture. She identified the first young woman on our left in the second row as Dorothy Vincent. There was a Dorothy Vincent living in the area, described below, who is probably her.

Dorothy Louise Vincent was born December 9, 1913, in Maple Heights Village, Ohio, the daughter of William J Vincent and Frances D O’Connor. In 1920 the family was living on Broadway in Maple Heights. Beside Dorothy and her parents there were Dorothy’s older sister Beatrice, her younger brothers Thomas and Paul, and a cousin, Marie Crone. Two other children would be born later: Paul and Rita.

Sadly, Dorothy Louise Vincent died March 2, 1926, at St. Alexis Hospital in Cleveland from acute appendicitis and the resulting infection. She was twelve years old. Her occupation was “student, Holy Name School.” She was buried March 5, 1926, in Calvary Cemetery.

If you are a relative of Dorothy Vincent you are welcome to download the class picture and pass it on.

Mary Raimer, 1922, Holy Name, Cleveland

Mary Raimer, 1922

Mary Raimer, 1922

The photographs section of this website includes a picture of the 1922 second grade class at Holy Name School, on Broadway on the southeast side of Cleveland. The picture is found at: Photographs > Cleveland Photographs > 1922 Holy Name Second Grade.

My mother was in that class and identified most of the children in the picture. She identified the second young woman from our left in the second row as Mary Raimer. There was a Mary Raimer described below, who is probably her.

I’m not as sure of this identification as I am of the others in this series because of the distance from her home to the school. But I don’t know if there were any Catholic schools closer to her at the time. I think there was a parish, but not a school.

Mary Raimer was born October 26, 1913, the daughter of Philip and Rose (Alten) Raimer. In 1920 the family was living on Libby Road in Maple Heights. The address is not on the census, but later records show that it was 17325 Libby. Beside Mary and her parents, there were her brothers and sisters: Raymond, Philip, Joseph, Loretta, Clement, Coletta, Gerald, and Bernard. Two older sisters, Gertrude and Isabelle, had already left home. Mary, her mother, and her brother Bernard were still at that address in 1940.

About 1948 or 1949 Mary E Raimer married Edward J Toeppe. At first they lived at the Libby Road home, then by 1954 they moved to Bedford. I didn’t find any children connected to them on the records.

Mary and Edward Toeppe were living in Bedford when Edward died in March of 1977. Mary (Raimer) Toeppe died in 1997.

If you are a relative or descendant of Mary Raimer you are welcome to download the class picture and pass it on.

Madeline Gutbrod, 1922, Holy Name, Cleveland

Madeline Gutbrod, 1922

Madeline Gutbrod, 1922

The photographs section of this website includes a picture of the 1922 second grade class at Holy Name School, on Broadway on the southeast side of Cleveland. The picture is found at: Photographs > Cleveland Photographs > 1922 Holy Name Second Grade.

My mother was in that class and identified most of the children in the picture. She identified the third young woman from our left in the second row as Madeline Gutbrod. There was a Madeline Gutbrod living in the area, described below, who is probably her.

Madeline Gutbrod and her family were living at 11010 Miles Ave in January 1920 when the census was taken. Besides Madeline there was her father John O Gutbrod, her mother Nora (McGuire), her sister Mary, and her brother John. The family was also at that address in 1922, the year the class photograph was taken. John Gutbrod managed the Emporium Millinery Company.

Sometime about 1939 or 1940 Madeline married Joseph Day. Together they raised seven sons and seven daughters. Madeline died in 1994; her husband had died the year before.

Parents of Madeline Gutbrod

The Huwiler Family Tree at ancestry.com has outlined the Gutbrod ancestry back to Offenbach, Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany.

So, contrarian that I am, I decided to take a look at Madeline’s mother’s side.

Nora McGuire was born February 14, 1882, in Ohio, presumably in Cleveland, the daughter of Bryan F McGuire and Nora Kane. Nora Kane had eleven children but only four outlived her: Nora and her sisters Helen, Mary, and Catherine. A brother James died at age 16 in 1891, and a brother Thomas at age 44 in 1917. The others died at birth or as young children.

Bryan McGuire was born in County Mayo, Ireland, in May of 1853, the son of Bryan F McGuire and Catherine McCaffery or McCafferty. He had a brother Thomas who also came to Cleveland, and Thomas married a woman named either Mary Conway or Mary McCormick.

Nora Kane was also born in County Mayo, on May 1, 1851. Her father’s name was Manus Kane; I couldn’t find her mother’s name on the American records online. I wonder if the McGuires and the Kanes knew each other in Ireland.

There is more about this family in the Family Trees > Other Families section of this website.

If you are a relative or descendant of Madeline Gutbrod you are welcome to download the class picture and pass it on.

The O’Rourke y-DNA Results

dna strandThe results of the O’Rourke Y-DNA test have come back from familyTreeDNA and they are a bit puzzling.

We were tested on 67 markers the first time, and on 37 markers the second. Here are the facts. I don’t know what conclusions to draw, but I will give it a try afterward.

  •  my two cousins’ y-DNA matched each other. So we know that there wasn’t a testing error on the first sample.
  • There are almost 6,000 results in the All Ireland Surnames project at familyTreeDNA including 14 O’Rourkes. We don’t match any of them on even 12 markers.
  • None of those 6,000 were for anyone named Brennan, Sloan, O’Rourke, Colgan, Cunningham, Rodgers, or Fearon, from Killowen or Kilkeel. Those are some common names in the area that I could remember.
  • We don’t match anyone at all on familyTreeDNA for 25, 37, or 67 markers, even allowing for 7 mutations difference.
  • We match two men named Mr. Ebrahem and Mr. Abbas on 12 markers, but, again, no Irishmen on 12 markers.
  • Finally, we know from the earlier autosomal DNA results that our O’Rourke family must have been in Ballintur, County Down, by at least 1779 when James Rourke was born, because we share a lot of autosomal DNA with his wife’s family, the Colgans.

Conclusions?

1. The O’Rourke DNA and the research are reliable as far back as we have traced them. In other words, my cousins’ DNA is the same as James Rourke’s would have been in 1779. Everything lines up as far as it goes.

2. We share a common ancestor with the two men, Mr Ebrahem and Mr Abbas, but it has to be well back into the Middle Ages, or else we would have matched them on more markers. Like before 1500 or so and probably way before.

Thoughts

The weird part is that we don’t share a common ancestor, even that far back, with anyone in the All Ireland Surnames project, or anyone else at all for that matter. You would think that in the course of 1,000 years or so someone would have “strayed” from their wife or wives and fathered a son who grew up with a different name, or that someone would have changed surnames for one reason or other.

For example, our Hamilton DNA matched a descendant of a man named Fields on all 37 markers. His descendants always had been told that he was a Hamilton by birth, but was raised by the Fields. And so it must have been.

Another example: my wife’s grandmother’s family name is Jenkins. But if they had their y-DNA tested it wouldn’t match any Jenkins at all, because about 1850 a man named Samuel Crimm came to Boston from New Jersey and started calling himself Charles Jenkins. A police matter? probably, but now they are Jenkins.

So what about the link to the Arabs?

Well my only two guesses are either:

1) someone named O’Rourke left Ireland, maybe at the Flight of the Earls or much earlier, for one reason or other, and ended up in the Middle East. He settled down and adopted a local surname.

2) Sometime in the Middle Ages a merchant from the Middle East came up the Atlantic Coast, found Carlingford Lough to his liking, and decided to stay.

I’m actually leaning toward the second, because if someone left Ireland wouldn’t he have left some genetic trace behind him? Or wouldn’t his father, his brother, or his male cousins have stayed and had descendants? Or did the whole family pack up and leave for the Mediterranean?

Another conclusion

Finally, another conclusion is more emotional. It is based on 1) no matches, 2) no other test from Killowen or Kilkeel, and 3) personal experience. That conclusion is that the people from that area were so isolated, between the Mourne Mountains and the sea, that they cared less about the rest of the island’s inhabitants until events forced them to do so.

And maybe that was because they weren’t related to any of them.

Patrick McQuaid of Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania

On April 30, 1827, “Patrick McQuaid, the son of Rudy McQuaid dec’d, of Hempfield township, Westmoreland county, and state of Pennsylvania,” signed indenture papers beginning his apprenticeship to George W and Jacob S Kern of Greensburg “by and with the advice and consent of his Mother.”  See the article: Patrick McQuaid, Jacob Kern, George W Kern, of Greensburgh, PA, Indenture Papers

Included among the persons signing the document is Margaret Bussard, who signed with her mark and Patrick McQuaid who signed with his.

Based on what I found at the McQuaid message board at rootsweb.com, there was a good sized McQuaid family in Westmoreland County, descended from eight sons of Patrick McQuaid and Catherine Graham, both born in County Down, Ireland. They settled first in Chester County, Pennsylvania, then moved to Westmoreland after the Revolution.

They are said to have had a son Roderick who died before 1820. This could be the “Rudy” father of Patrick, apprentice to the Kern brothers. “Roddy” is a nickname for Roderick and would sound a lot like “Rudy” if spoken with even the slightest Irish accent. Patrick’s father was deceased, which agrees with the information that Roderick had died by 1820.

If so, that would mean that Roderick McQuaid married a woman named Margaret; and that Margaret’s second husband was named Bussard.

If any McQuaid descendants have more information about Patrick, I would be interested in learning it.

Sources:
The helpful posts at rootsweb were:
Re: Patrick McQuaid, Posted: 8 Oct 2003, by Robert E. McQuaid
Re: Children of Patrick & Catherine Graham McQuade; PA, Posted: 5 Nov 2005, by rlmcilvain
Children of Patrick & Catherine Graham McQuaid Posted: 29 Oct 2005 , by aohkii